How to Dry Pumpkin Seeds at Home for Best Results

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Pumpkin, also referred to as a cultivar of winter squash, is common among people because of its antioxidant properties.

The low-calorie vegetable is rich in fiber, protects consumers against asthma and drastically lowers the risk of obesity.

Drying your pumpkin seeds is a necessary step before you roast them to consume them as a healthy snack.

There are a multitude of alternatives for doing so; how do you pick the simplest one?

Don’t worry; we’ve put in hours of testing and practice to come up with three simple ways to dry pumpkin seeds.

Before you Dry your Pumpkin Seeds

It is essential for you to meticulously clean your pumpkin seeds. Do so until you can’t find any more pumpkin guts.

The simplest way for doing so is plunking the seeds along with the guts inside an enormous bowl filled with water. Use your fingers to break them apart.

Pumpkin seeds will now float on top of the water bowl and you can clean them with ease. It is suggested to utilize sugar pumpkin seeds as they turn out much crispier when dried.

How to Dry Pumpkin Seeds Using an Oven

Time needed: 4 hours.

Using an oven to dry your pumpkin seeds is quite an effective method. It will dry the seeds instantly but you will have to keep a watch to ensure that they don’t get overheated.

Optimum temperature: 200 degrees Fahrenheit

  1. What will you need?

    1. Pumpkin seeds
    2. Colander
    3. A cookie sheet or a baking sheet

  2. Wash the Pumpkin Seeds

    Rinse the seeds with cool water in a colander. Fill a sink with water and a colander with all of your seeds.

    Fill the colander halfway with cold water and swirl it in a circle to fully cover the seeds.

    With the water running, keep the colander aside and pass the seeds around with your hands to ensure that their entire surface is exposed to water.

  3. Preheat the Oven

    Preheat your oven to the lowest setting possible. For most ovens, this is 200 degrees Fahrenheit.

    Place the oven rack in the oven’s lowest position. To track temperature more precisely, use an oven thermometer.

  4. Arrange the Pumpkin Seeds

    Place your pumpkin seeds on a cookie or baking sheet and spread them out evenly. Make sure they are all in one layer, and there is no overlap.

    When spreading pumpkin seeds on a cookie sheet to dry, do not leave them in clumps. They will not dry thoroughly and this might cause molds to develop on them.

  5. Dry your Seeds

    Place your baking sheet on top of the oven rack and dry the seeds for 3 to 4 hours.

  6. Check the Pumpkin Seeds

    To stop scorching your seeds, stir them with a spoon every 20 to 30 minutes.

    Danny shows you how to perfectly carry out this method here.

  7. Let them Cool Down

    Keep them aside and let them cool down for sometime.

Dry Pumpkin Seeds Using a Food Dehydrator

Time taken: 1 to 2 hours

Optimum temperature: Anywhere between 115 to 120 degrees Fahrenheit.

What will you need?

  • Pumpkin seeds
  • Dehydrator racks
  • Colander
  • Parchment paper
  • Paper bag or an envelope

Using a food dehydrator to dry your pumpkin seeds before you can roast them is the quickest method available.

It is quite simple to follow and you will have fresh dried pumpkin seeds within just 2 hours.

Wash the Pumpkin Seeds

Rinse the seeds with cool water in a colander. Fill a sink with water and a colander with all of your seeds.

Fill the colander halfway with cold water and swirl it in a circle to fully cover the seeds. Now, set the colander down.

While the tap is running, move the seeds around with your hands to ensure that their entire surface is exposed to water.

Arrange your Pumpkin Seeds

Place them in a single layer on a dehydrator rack. Ensure that no seeds are overlapping.

If your dehydrator rack has holes, cut some parchment paper into small squares and line the rack to keep your seeds from falling through.

To avoid uneven dehydration, limit your seeds to one dehydrator rack per batch.

Dry the Pumpkin Seeds

Set your dehydrator anywhere between 115 to 120 degrees Fahrenheit and wait. To ensure even dehydration, stir the seeds every 20 minutes.

Let them Cool Down

Keep your dried pumpkin seeds aside and let them cool down for sometime.

Place the dried pumpkin seeds in a paper bag or an envelope before you plant or roast them. Any seeds that have mould or mildew should be discarded.

Dry Pumpkin Seeds by Leaving

Time taken: 1 month

Optimum temperature: Room temperature

What will you need?

  • Pumpkin seeds
  • Baking sheets or a cookie sheet
  • Colander

Leaving your pumpkin seeds to air dry is a method which consumes the most time for drying seeds.

However, it is recommended to go for this method if you wish to avoid the chances of your pumpkin seeds getting overheated at all costs.

Wash the Seeds

In a colander, rinse the seeds with cool water. Fill a sink with a colander and pour all of your seeds into it.

Fill the colander halfway with cool water and swirl it around in a circle to cover all of the seeds. Then, set the colander down.

While the tap is running, move the seeds around with your hands to expose their whole surface to water.

Arrange your Pumpkin Seeds

On a cookie or baking sheet, spread out the pumpkin seeds. Fill the sheet halfway with clean seeds and spread them out uniformly in a single layer.

Ensure that no seeds are touching or resting on top of one another. If you can’t fit all of the seeds on one sheet, spread them out over several sheets.

Dry your Seeds

Dry your seeds for at least a month in a cool, dry spot. Look for a place that isn’t prone to dampness.

A shaded outdoor area, such as a shed or hayloft, or an indoor location, such as a shed or hayloft, will suffice.

Avoid drying them in enclosed spaces with no ventilation, such as garages, and never in a basement.

Check your Seeds

Check and turn your drying pumpkin seeds regularly to ensure even drying on both sides. Keep your seeds from clumping together.

They won’t dry completely, which could lead to mould growth. The most efficient and safest form of drying is air drying, but it is also the most time-consuming.

The Right Way to Store Dried Pumpkin Seeds Safely

Use a clean, dry, and airtight jar- essential if your dried pumpkin seeds will be used as a snack or a food ingredient. You can keep the seeds for three months at room temperature.

Check them for any signs of mould regularly. If you see some mould, get rid of it right away. You can store the seeds in the freezer for up to a year as well.

Our Take on Which Method is Best

If you only need a small number of dried pumpkin seeds right away, you can use a food dehydrator to dry them. Using an oven to dry your pumpkin seeds is the quickest method for doing so.

You can dry them in bulk as well and would not need to wait for long before roasting them.

If you wish to not use any equipment, you can leave your pumpkin seeds to air dry at room temperature.

This is the best method to avoid the chances of your pumpkin seeds burning or overheating at all costs. You can also dry them in bulk using drying racks.

FAQs

How long should I wait before I can grow dried pumpkin seeds?

You can either wait until next year to plant them or roast them whenever you like! If any seeds have mildew or mould on them, toss them out before storing them.

Why is drying your pumpkin seeds so important?

Always dry your seeds before roasting them, as this allows seasoning and oil to cling to them more efficiently, resulting in crispier results.

Can I refrigerate my dried pumpkin seeds for increasing their shelf life?

You should place all of your seeds in an envelope or a paper bag and keep them cool and dry. Place them in the refrigerator if you can’t find a suitable spot.

Bottom Line

We’ve gone through three simple ways to dry pumpkin seeds for various purposes. Hopefully, this guide has helped you learn how to dry pumpkin seeds at home.

If you found this article insightful, do share it with your friends and family, and feel free to leave any questions in the comments section below!

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About Betty Ellis

Betty is a food researcher who spends most of her time analyzing the nutritional aspects of various foods. She also researches methods to enhance taste, as well as how to store certain types of foods. She enjoys cooking for herself and her three dogs even though she doesn't have a lot of free time outside work.

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