Cheese Names Starting with B (Popular & Exotic)

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This is the ultimate list of cheese, both popular and rare starting with B.

Cheese is delicious and versatile food that can be enjoyed in many different ways.

Cheese can be used as the main ingredient in dishes, or it can be enjoyed on its own as a snack. T

There are many different types of cheese, and each type has its own unique flavor and texture.

So, here is the list!

1. Bandal Cheese

Origin Country: India
Protected Status: 
No
Milk Used:
 Cow’s milk

Bandal cheese is a soft, unripened cheese made from cow’s milk.

It gets its name from the town of Bandal, located near Calcutta, India. Both smoked and unsmoked versions of this cheese are made.

2. Banon Cheese

Origin Country: France
Protected Status: 
Yes
Milk Used:
 Goat’s milk

The cheese gets its name from the village of Banon in the Provence region of southeastern France.

Banon cheese is an AOP-designated cheese made from the milk of chèvre commune provençale goats, using traditional cheesemaking techniques.

This cheese has a long and storied history – it is mentioned in texts dating back to the Middle Ages.

Want to know more? Here is a great video on making the cheese –

3. Batzos Cheese

Origin Country: Greece
Protected Status: 
Yes
Milk Used:
 Goat / Sheep milk

Batzos cheese is a low-fat, semihard cheese that is produced mainly in Western Macedonia, Greece.

It enjoys PDO status and is prepared from goat and sheep milk.

It is characterized by a slightly piquant taste and a large number of eyes (holes) in the body.

4. Beaufort Cheese

Origin Country: France
Protected Status: 
Yes
Milk Used:
 Cow’s milk

Beaufort cheese is a hard, cooked cheese made from the raw milk of Tarine and Abondance cows.

The cows graze in the mountains of the Savoie region in eastern France, and the cheese is produced in cooperative dairies only from whole raw milk.

It is produced twice a day, immediately after milking.

Beaufort cheese has been an AOC (appellation d’origine contrôlée) since 1968 and, since 2009, has a PDO label.

Here is a how the cheese tastes like!

5. Bergkäse Cheese

Origin Country: Switzerland, Austria, and Germany
Protected Status: 
Yes (in Austria)
Milk Used:
 Goat, sheep and cow

Bergkäse is an Alpine-style hard cheese that is produced within the borders of Switzerland, Austria, and Germany.

The milk for this cheese is only collected in the morning, and the cheesemaking process also takes place during this time.

Enjoys PDO status in Austria.

Bergkäse was originally defined by transhumance, which is the seasonal movement of people and their livestock between highland and lowland pastures.

More information on Alpine cheese is here –

6. Bitto Cheese

Origin Country: Italy
Protected Status: 
Yes
Milk Used:
 Cow’s milk

Bitto is a traditional Italian cheese that is produced in the mountainous region of Sondrio, located in northern Italy.

The cheese gets its name from the Bitto River, which runs through the area where it is made.

Bitto cheese is made using milk from cows that graze on the high mountain pastures of the region.

The cheese enjoys PDO status and is only produced during the months of June through September, when the cows’ milk is at its peak.

The cheese is then aged for a minimum of 70 days in high-altitude dairies or lower-altitude stations within the production area.

Want to know more about Bitto cheese? Check out this video –

7. Bleu d’Auvergne Cheese

Origin Country: France
Protected Status:
Yes 
Milk Used:
 Cow’s milk

Bleu d’Auvergne is a blue-veined cheese prepared from French cow’s milk in Cantal and Puy de Dôme départements. It is PDO cheese.

A cheese to be served at the end of a meal, Bleu d’Auvergne is also used in local recipes, salads, or sauces.

Here are some more details on this cheese –

8. Bleu de Gex Cheese

Origin Country: Switzerland
Protected Status: 
Yes
Milk Used:
 Cow’s milk

Bleu de Gex cheese is a very mild blue cheese with aromas of hazelnut and mushroom.

It is made from the milk of Montbéliarde or Simmental cows and has a long history dating back to the Jura Mountains at the French-Swiss border.

The cheese is mostly consumed locally.

It enjoys AOC and AOP status.

More about the cheese here –

9. Bleu des Causses Cheese

Origin Country: France
Protected Status: 
Yes
Milk Used:
 Cow’s milk

Bleu des Causses is a semisoft French blue cheese that gained appellation d’origine contrôlée (AOC) status in 1953.

It is prepared with whole cow’s milk. It is very creamy, with a high-fat content of 45 percent, and has a sweet yet spicy flavor.

The cheese melts powerfully in the mouth and pairs well with dessert and sweet white wines.

10. Bleu du Vercors-Sassenage Cheese

Origin Country: France
Protected Status:
Yes 
Milk Used:
 Cow’s milk

Bleu du Vercors-Sassenage is a delicious, creamy blue-veined cheese with a rich history dating back to the Middle Ages.

This cheese is produced in the Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes region of France, in an area known as the Parc Naturel Régional du Vercors.

The cheese has a unique and complex flavor, with notes of hazelnut, undergrowth, and mushroom.

It is one of the smallest French cow’s milk cheeses with a protected designation of origin (PDO), meaning that it can only be produced in this specific region using traditional methods.

Know more about its preparation here –

11. Boeren-Leidse met sleutels Cheese

Origin Country: Netherlands
Protected Status: 
Yes
Milk Used:
 Cow’s milk

Boeren-Leidse met sleutels cheese is a Dutch cheese that has been granted protected designation of origin (PDO) status (in 1997).

Boeren-Leidse met sleutels cheese has a long history, dating back to the Middle Ages.

The cheese is produced in the area around the Old Rhine River, near the city of Leiden, and must use milk from certain breeds of cattle.

The cheeses are imprinted with the symbol of crossed keys (sleutels in Dutch), the coat of arms of the city of Leiden.

12. Bohinjski sir Cheese

Origin Country: Slovenia
Protected Status: 
No
Milk Used:
 Cow’s milk

Bohinjski sir, also known as Bohinj cheese, is a hard cow’s milk cheese that originated in the Bohinj region of Slovenia.

This cheese has been produced since 1873 and is made from raw or thermalized cow’s milk. The final product has numerous large eyes.

The rind of the cheese is firm, dry, and yellow, while the cheese body is ivory to yellow.

The flavor of Bohinjski sir is mild and aromatic with a nut-like taste.

13. Bovški sir Cheese

Origin Country: Slovenia
Protected Status: 
Yes
Milk Used:
 Sheep’s milk

Bovški sir is a hard Slovenian cheese with a PDO designation.

The cheese has excellent quality and was historically valued much higher than other cheeses.

The cheese is primarily made from raw sheep’s milk of the Bovška Ovca breed.

The taste and smell of Bovški cheese are well-rounded.

14. Brânză de burduf Cheese

Origin Country: Romania
Protected Status: 
No
Milk Used:
 Sheep’s milk

Brânză de Burduf is a traditional Romanian cheese that is made in the Bucegi Mountains. It starts out as Caș, a fresh cheese made by curdling sheep’s milk with rennet and draining the whey.

It is one of the country’s most well-known cheese.

It becomes Brânză de Burduf after the curds are broken into small bits, mixed with salt, and then packed into traditional “bellows”.

This cheese is an important part of Romanian culture and cuisine and is often served on special occasions. It melts easily in the mouth.

Here is more about the making of this cheese –

15. Brie de Meaux Cheese

Origin Country: France
Protected Status: 
Yes
Milk Used:
 Cow’s milk

Brie de Meaux is a French soft cheese made from raw cow’s milk.

It has a white mold, and its origins are thought to date back to the seventh century.

Brie de Meaux obtained appellation d’origine protéger (AOP) status in 1996.

The texture of the fully matured cheese is supple, and it gains delicate aromas of cream, butter, and hazelnuts.

Here is a great video on making this amazing cheese –

16. Brillat-Savarin Cheese

Origin Country: France
Protected Status: 
No
Milk Used:
 Cow’s milk

Brillat-Savarin cheese is a rich, creamy cheese that was developed in the 1930s by Pierre and Henri Androuët.

The cheese is made from pasteurized milk and has a semisoft texture. It is a Triple cream cow milk cheese.

The mouthfeel of the cheese is reminiscent of tangy, sour, and mushroomy softened butter. It goes ver well with sparkling wines.

Know more about this amazing cheese here –

17. Brin d’Amour Cheese

Origin Country: France
Protected Status: 
No
Milk Used:
 Sheep’s milk

Brin d’Amour cheese is a Corsican specialty made from sheep’s milk or sometimes goat’s milk.

The animals graze on the wild herbs, flowers, and brush of the rugged Corsican landscape, which imparts a unique flavor to the cheese.

As the cheese ages, it becomes firm and flaky with an intensified earthy flavor and aroma of the herbs. The end product is a small and squatty square or nest shipped rind.

This cheese is not widely available outside of Corsica, so if you’re lucky enough to find it, be sure to give it a try!

18. Brocciu Cheese

Origin Country: France
Protected Status: 
Yes
Milk Used:
 Ewe or Goat’s milk

Brocciu is a delicious cheese that originates from the island of Corsica.

This cheese is made exclusively from the whey of ewe’s or goat’s milk and has a soft, creamy texture that makes it perfect for any occasion.

Brocciu has both AOC and PDO status.

Know more about making of these cheese here –

19. Burrata Cheese

Origin Country: Italy
Protected Status: 
No
Milk Used:
 Cow’s milk

Burrata originated from the commune of Andria, in the Apulia region of Italy. The cheese is made from cow’s milk and has a rich, buttery flavor.

The name burrata comes from the Italian word for butter, which is fitting given the creamy texture of the cheese.

It needs to be eaten fresh. It has a shelf life of about 48 hours.

Here is a great video on burrata cheese –

20. Burrini Cheese

Origin Country: Italy
Protected Status: 
No
Milk Used:
 Cow’s milk

Burrini cheese which is eaten primarily as a table cheese is composed of an outer layer of cow’s milk cheese and an inner layer of butter.

It is produced in many parts of southern Italy, in the regions of Campania, Puglia, etc.

The cheeses are typically matured for at least six to eight days.

Burrini cheese has a mild, buttery flavor yet a distinctive, some say pungent, aroma.

If you are looking for more cheese names, check out our Long List of Cheese

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About Betty Ellis

Betty is a food researcher who spends most of her time analyzing the nutritional aspects of various foods. She also researches methods to enhance taste, as well as how to store certain types of foods. She enjoys cooking for herself and her three dogs even though she doesn't have a lot of free time outside work.

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